How to Go from Rock to American Heritage Music (3 of 4): Woody Guthrie and Lead Belly

This is post 3 of 4 in the series How to Go from Rock to American Heritage Music.

I don’t remember the first time I heard or read the name Woody Guthrie. Does anybody? For what seems like my entire life I associated him with “This Land is Your Land” and nothing more. As my musical outlook was expanding in the 1990s, thanks in large part to my exploration of the Byrds’ Sweetheart of the Rodeo album (see part 1 of this series), I happened upon a CD called Folkways: The Original Vision. The album, which launched the nonprofit Smithsonian Folkways label in 1989, was a collection of Woody Guthrie and Lead Belly recordings from the 1940s.

I loved it from the opening notes of the first track – “Sylvie” by Lead Belly and Anne Graham. Just listen…

The album included one of Lead Belly’s several recordings of “Midnight Special,” a song that I knew from Creedence Clearwater Revival’s later version. “Midnight Special” is a traditional folk song that became a staple among folk and rock singers. It has been performed and recorded by Little Richard, Van Morrison, Harry Belafonte, Paul McCartney, and many others.

Another Lead Belly song from the album, “Rock Island Line,” was covered by the Beatles in their original incarnation as a skiffle group, The Quarrymen. Skiffle was a music craze in England in the 1950s that consisted of British youth playing American folk and blues songs on whatever instruments they could obtain or devise. Many of the rock artists associated with the 1960s British Invasion, including the Rolling Stones, the Animals, and the Who, started out listening to and playing skiffle. Skiffle bands learned more than a few songs from Lead Belly and Woody Guthrie records.

The Lead Belly songs onĀ Folkways: The Original VisionĀ were more interesting and satisfying to me at the time than the Woody Guthrie songs, but the influence Woody had on one of my favorite artists, Bob Dylan, was unmistakable. Before he began writing his own songs, Dylan was “like a Woody Guthrie jukebox,” as he later described himself. When he did begin writing songs, Dylan borrowed melodies and song styles from Woody.

Folkways: The Original Vision included one of Woody’s recordings of “Pretty Boy Floyd. ” This song was covered by the Byrds on Sweetheart of the Rodeo. The floodgates were open. The connections I was making between older folk and country music and the rock music I loved were undeniable, and I was compelled to swim further up the stream.

Continued in part 4 of 4. Sign up to receive future posts by email using the box on the right.

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